How to Confront Other Parents at School

As parents, you want what’s best for your children. Sometimes, this means you become frustrated with decisions made by other parents: perhaps they sent their sick child to school and that child ended up getting your child sick. It might be behavioral; they taught your child a bad word or an unacceptable behavior that your child is now using. Worse still, another child could bully your child.

Which begs the question: Are there ever circumstances under which it is okay to confront another parent? And if so, how should it be done?

First, determine whether a confrontation should happen

To do so, consider the following factors: Continue reading “How to Confront Other Parents at School”

How to Boost Your Child’s Confidence

5 cool ways to increase self-esteem

Most parents have one vision in common: they want their children to be happy and confident. Confidence can help your child perform better in school, navigate social situations, and grow into successful, happy adults. The good news is that confidence can be cultivated from an early age. Unfortunately, it can sometimes feel challenging, especially if your child is shy or introverted. That said, finding ways to boost your child’s self-esteem is key for children who are faced with high-pressure situations, like standardized tests or the first day of school.
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So, how can you help your child have strong self-esteem, so they thrive in school and into adulthood? Here are five simple strategies:

Continue reading “How to Boost Your Child’s Confidence”

Tips to Improve Your Child’s School Success

Setting your child up for success doesn’t have to be difficult. A few simple action items can go a long way. Being present is key, whether it’s reviewing your child’s homework and schedule, or making sure you’re up-to-date on emails from the teacher (and sending them questions you have!). If there’s a parent portal available, make sure you use it. Helping your child get organized at the beginning of the year, and checking in with their system periodically, can also be a big help. Make it a fun project, finding notebooks, planners, and calendars your child is drawn to.

Finally, nurture your child’s education by promoting a growth mindset. Remind them that mistakes are okay, and a part of the learning process. Help them take care of themselves emotionally and physically, providing appropriate praise and making sure they (and you!) get plenty of rest.

 

Free Online Video Training

In February 2017, I will be releasing a 3-part video training focusing on how parents can build critical thinking skills in children preschool through second grade.

The training will start with explaining the “what” and “why” of critical thinking including it’s potential for academic motivation in preschoolers, struggling students and gifted learners.

Then we’ll review assumptions that prevent parents from fostering (and children from gaining) “good thinking” experiences, and the impacts of these pitfalls on a child’s ability to build proficient reading skills and math number sense.

The last video will give you some quick & easy tips to implement into your already (time-strapped) busy schedule. If you are interested in this training, just click here to you’ll be signed up to be notified when the videos are ready.

 

Offscreen vs. Onscreen Learning

 

HOW TO BALANCE TECHNOLOGY & PLAY

Create a structure around both off and onscreen learning

The key factor isn’t the means through which your child is learning: it’s the structure around it. For example, giving your child free reign to do whatever he or she pleases on an iPad may be somewhat less effective than scheduling a block of time for them to engage in highly-acclaimed learning apps.

This holds true for offscreen play as well. You don’t need to dictate every activity your child engages in, but it’s good to be cognizant of how they spend the blocks of time where no screen is involved.

Remain a part of the process

Whether you’re helping your child build something from blocks or asking questions about the learning app they’re playing with, your participation matters.

While it can be tempting to let your child “figure it out on their own”, it’s important to remain invested in the process. Ask questions, show your interest, and let your child know that you want to be involved, regardless of what the activity may be. Continue reading “Offscreen vs. Onscreen Learning”