What Does Prep Have To Do With Being Gifted?

What does prep have to do with being gifted?

I spend a lot of time talking about the value of “thinking prep” and how to effectively prepare your children to be thoughtful, curious individuals. The Critical Thinking Child was founded on this idea, and the prep we provide does so much more than prepare your child for a test–it cultivates a lifelong love of learning.

But what does prep have to do with being gifted?

It’s a good question, and one I hear frequently. My answer?

You can’t wish, teach or prep a child to be gifted but you can improve their thinking skills

As parents, we can give the gift of education but you can’t wish, teach, or prep a child to be gifted.

A child’s gifts take on many forms, and even the term “gifted” is often nuanced.  We prefer terms like high-performing, high-achieving or high-potential students.

Does this mean prep is useless? Of course not. Children acquire and build their gifts and talents through exposure to the world around them.  Our program focuses on nurturing these natural gifts within your child. We stimulate and stretch their natural talents and supports their academic struggles. Our prep is an opportunity to teach your child how to think critically, regardless of labels.

Through critical thinking, children have the potential to be our greatest assets

The skills we teach at The Critical Thinking Child support talented children in reaching their full potential. Our students develop higher-level thinking skills and accelerate their academic potential. Under our care, children learn to concentrate, listen, and focus. All of our prep serves this purpose.

In addition, we want to empower you, as a parent, to foster your child’s gifts at home. Highly intelligent, unique children may require more attention, and our tips and strategies will help you promote and nurture them in their daily life. Together, we will be able to help children develop their critical thinking skills and give them a chance to explore their interests and discover their passions.

By doing so, we awaken within our children their potential to be our greatest thinkers, scientists, teachers, artists, and leaders.

Gifting education to your future generation

Something magical happens through our program. As we connect with the child, they begin to explore and ask questions. They hone in on their talents and passions and develop a deeper understanding of their world. Our parents are able to witness and experience the joy of their gift of education.

Let’s be honest, enrolling in our program will not make your child gifted.

What it will accomplish is giving you, as a parent, the chance to give the gift of education.

I stand by our motto—“Gifting Education to Your Future Generation”—and together, we will give your child the chance to reach their academic potential and prep for a lifetime love of learning, inquiry, and exploration.

When Your Busy Child Won’t Focus

When your busy child won’t focus

How to get–and keep–your child’s attention.

 

When your young child is constantly distracted by, well, everything, it can be hard to make learning stick. Sometimes it can be difficult just to get their attention long enough to check in with them, let alone introduce a new concept.

While it can be frustrating to have a child who seems constantly preoccupied, it is possible to teach them how to become more adept at compartmentalizing and focusing. This revolves around two key skills: listening and attention.

Honing in on listening skills

Listening skills come into play when students have something they need to remember and focus on. For example, activities that require pattern recognition also require a good amount of focus. If students are seeking out a familiar pattern (ABAB, for instance), they will need to trust in their own ability to focus. If they begin to struggle, they will have to seek help and practice listening to the prompts given to them.

Similarly, memory games help students improve their recall and their ability to retell stories. I’m particularly fond of abstract puzzles, which provide a layer of complexity that often requires the use of listening skills. Putting children in pairs can also help develop this skill.

Finally, you can help your young learner develop listening skills by reading to them. By teaching young learners to recognize and focus on the sounds of the English language they will be more tuned to it. This includes the 44 phonic sounds, rhymes, onomatopoeia, and alliteration. Picture books and beginning chapter books are great starting points. For the particularly distracted child, don’t pressure them to finish the book in one sitting. You can always go back to it or re-read it.

Developing longer attention spans

Help your child increase their attention span by providing them with activities that grab their interest and keep it. For example, if their focus seems to wander when reading books, switch up the genre. By deviating beyond fairy tale stories and including a wider variety, you allow students to find their preferences.

In particular, including books with real-world information will give them a new perspective on reading and digesting information. If your child finds a topic they are particularly enthralled by, encourage their interest

Additionally, critical thinking games and puzzles provide ample opportunities for developing attention spans. Forcing your child to think outside of the box through new topics, classifications, and activities will help them understand and interpret their world in new ways. This often results in a spark of curiosity and interest, leading to longer attention spans.

The benefits of abstract puzzles

Abstract puzzles are a great way to help encourage students to be more focused. As you can see from the video below, when abstract puzzles are introduced into a child’s learning environment it requires both listening skills and a long attention span:

 

How Do Parent-Teacher Conferences Work?

Productive Parent-Teacher Conferences: A Primer

Parent-teacher conferences may seem intimidating, but they don’t have to be. After all, you and your child’s teacher share the common goal of helping your child succeed. Each conference is a new opportunity to develop an action plan for your child’s success.
There are a few things you can do to ensure that both you and the teacher get the most out of the conference.

Do Your Homework

The best way to be a part of your child’s success is by becoming familiar with what he or she is learning. Play an active role in their education by staying on top of their grades. Continue reading “How Do Parent-Teacher Conferences Work?”

5 Misconceptions Preschool Parents Make About Academic Assessments

As a parent, you want to help your child succeed. We know exactly how you feel: we’re parents, too. Thinking ahead to Kindergarten there can be a lot of pressure to ensure your child is properly prepared.

Let us help you with our academic assessments, which are designed to take the chance out of education. We will show you the exact areas where you can best help your child. No more running around for resources. No more stressing over whether you’re teaching the “right” concept. Continue reading “5 Misconceptions Preschool Parents Make About Academic Assessments”