Tips for Surviving AP Exams

Each May, Advanced Placement (AP) exams are taken by students all over the world. These standardized exams are designed to measure how well students have mastered the content and skills taught through the course. A qualifying score could potentially earn the student college credit, testing them out of the corresponding college-level course.

But what, exactly, are Advanced Placement exams, and how can you best prepare for them?

An Overview of Advanced Placement exams

While in high school, a student will often have the choice of taking an Advanced Placement course. This course correlates directly to an AP exam, which is taken at the end of the year (though you do not need to take the course to take the exam).

There are 38 different AP exams, each with its own unique requirements, covering a wide array of subject areas. Many of the exams consist of both a free response essay section and a multiple-choice section, and all exams are timed.

AP exams are graded on a five-point scale, with five being the highest possible score. According to College Board, the organization responsible for the creation, distribution, and scoring of the exams, a score of 5 is equivalent to grades of A+ or A in the corresponding college course. AP Exam score of 4 is equivalent to a grade of A-, B+, or B, and a score of 3 is equivalent to a B-, C+, or C in college.

For students who want to begin their college studies before graduating high school, AP exams provide a wonderful opportunity to earn credit. That said, these courses are college-level, and therefore the concepts are sometimes difficult. Taking time to prepare – both for the content and the results – is invaluable.

Do not over-study. Take time to relax

It can be tempting to continue cramming until just before the test begins, but at some point no amount of last-ditch studying will help. Instead, give your brain a break and focus on being confident and feeling prepared.  As exams approach, set boundaries around your study time and stick to them. Your mind needs time to absorb the information, so it’s important to take it in at the right speed.

Often, you can study better when you aren’t studying at all. The mind can retain more information by applying it, not reading it in a textbook or on flash cards.  To feel better prepared, look up relevant articles or go outside and have real world experiences that relate to the content.

Take a practice AP test before the test

There are practice exams available on the College Board website, and a number of different test prep websites. By using one of these tools you give yourself the opportunity to become familiar with the layout of the exam and the format of the questions. Your practice test score may be lower than you like, but if you continue to practice you may get a higher score on test day.

Arrive prepared, in mind and body

When exam day arrives, focus on preparing your mind and body. This means eating a good breakfast, looking over any last-minute notes (without trying to cram everything in) and making sure you get a good night’s rest the night before.

In addition, make sure you arrive with the proper materials. A No. 2 pencil may be required for the multiple choice section of the test, while a pen with black or dark blue ink may be needed any free-response questions. Do not expect these to be available to you at the testing site; rather, come with them in your possession. I would not recommend using ballpoint pens on an AP test because the ink is lighter and you have to apply more pressure when writing. Use a rollerball pen so the ink can flow out more easily and you can use less pressure.  You’re less likely to have to stop and massage your hands when you are writing.

Watch the clock

AP exams are timed, so pace yourself and keep calm as you complete the questions. Don’t rush, but don’t allow a single question to hang you up for too long.

Use the multiple choice as a review before you complete the free response questions. Remember as much as you can from the multiple choice section, such as events and time periods, as this could be helpful for brainstorming what to write for the essay

AP  stands for “answer the prompts”

When responding to the free response questions, pay careful attention to how the prompt is worded. The quality of your writing won’t matter if you aren’t fully answering the question. Keep in mind that different tests are looking for different kinds of essays, and within a given test there may be multiple essays of different types.

For example, the AP Language and Composition exam consists of three different essay types: A General Argument, Rhetorical Analysis, and Synthesis Essay. Each of these prompts require a different skill-set, and you should have experience writing each.

Don’t be disappointed

Advanced Placement exams are inherently difficult, and they demand a depth of knowledge, the ability to analyze and synthesize information, and strong skills in the subject area. Prepare as best you can, seek out the help of your instructor when needed, and use whatever resources are available to you.

You may not get the score you expect, and that’s okay. The test and its corresponding course are still designed to prepare you for a college-level course, and that preparation is invaluable.

How to choose the right tutor for your child

It’s a familiar scenario for parents: your child is struggling with a school subject, or you decide they need additional enrichment. Given your own busy schedule, you find that an outside tutor is your best option.

Once the decision to hire a tutor is made, you have to actually find one. If you’ve never gone through the process before, it can quickly become both overwhelming and confusing. There are so many considerations: What qualifications should you look for? What makes a good tutor? Will my child and the tutor get along? What if I make the wrong choice?

While it can seem like a huge burden at the onset, there are specific factors you can look for to make this process easy and the transition into tutoring smooth.

Evaluate the experience of potential tutors

Your tutor doesn’t have to be a former teacher, but he or she does need a good amount of experience working with students of different ages and learning styles. This could come in a variety of forms: tutoring experience, teaching experience, or volunteer experience.

When you first meet with your tutor, make sure they can tell you how they have effectively worked with students with different learning styles. For example, if your child learns kinesthetically (by doing), sitting at a table and drilling flash cards will not be an effective teaching method. Similarly, if your child learns best by listening, walking around and writing will not be effective. Make sure your tutor is a good match for your child’s unique learning style.

It’s also important to make sure the tutor can not just convey facts but also help your child build their critical thinking skills and higher order thinking. This can include creative projects that synthesize learned information, answering higher level thinking skills that ask for evaluation and evidence, or by offering an opinion backed up with facts. Not only do these methods make material more interesting for students, they increase valuable critical thinking skills that will be vital to their future in schooling.

Look for a breadth of knowledge

Not only should a qualified tutor have tutoring experience, but they should also have a wide range of experience, both with age range and with subject matter.

It’s important to find a tutor that can teach more than one grade, preferably a range of at least 3 grades. This vertical perspective can help the tutor understand where your child may be experiencing learning gaps while also having an understanding of where the curriculum (and the tutoring program) will go in the future.

Even if your child is struggling in just one subject, it’s helpful to find a tutor proficient in teaching in more than one area (in particular, both reading and math). An integrated approach to tutoring that incorporates multiple subjects simultaneously will help your child approach critical thinking from an interdisciplinary view.

Additionally, any technique a tutor uses should be research-based and backed by data that shows its effectiveness. Don’t be afraid to ask your tutor about the research behind their methods! Continue reading “How to choose the right tutor for your child”

How do you respond when your child asks: “Am I Stupid?”

Many parents and teachers dread their child asking this question, and it can be an intimidating one to answer. If disregarded, it can allow the child to internalize a negative self-belief. If approached with care and consideration, it can become a powerful, teachable moment and lead to valuable dialogue. As a result, the child can learn how to not only think of themselves in a more positive light, but also how to think critically about how they learn.

Here are a few talking points to facilitate this tough conversation:

Reflect on the power of perseverance

Author, professor, and researcher Carol Dweck often speaks of the “growth mindset.” In short, this refers to intelligence that expands (or grows) over time. Rather than looking at someone’s inherent ability to solve a problem, the growth mindset focuses on the effort put in.

When a child asks if they are stupid, remind them that no one is stupid, and everyone has room to grow if they take the time and put in the effort. It’s important to emphasize here that while your child might not know something, that doesn’t put it outside of their realm of possibility. It just means they don’t know it YET. This can teach them the power of persevering to learn a new skill.

Encourage your child to abandon the phrase “I can’t do this,” instead asking for help or finding areas to improve. Ask open-ended questions that allow them to explore the challenge in a new way, thinking about it critically.

Model how to manage frustration

Growth takes time and effort. As adults, we know this, but when a child is struggling to learn a new skill it can quickly become upsetting. Showing your child how to acknowledge and manage this frustration is key to facilitating growth and helping them feel capable.

Some helpful strategies include deep breathing, physical breaks, and brief distractions. Something as simple as going for a walk or singing a silly song can provide the mental break needed to lower frustration levels and work through challenging situations.

Modeling this for your child is also helpful. When you find yourself in frustrating situations, take the time to emulate these strategies. Then you can use yourself as an example when your child calls their intelligence into question, acknowledging that even you become frustrated and must take certain steps to alleviate the negative feelings.

Teach your child that “smart” looks different in different people

Every person learns differently, and taking the time to explain this to your child can help them grapple with their own doubts around their intelligence.

Emphasize with your child that everyone has that which comes naturally to them and that which they struggle with. Taking the problem and approaching it in a new way can open up new possibilities for understanding.

Additionally, “smart” doesn’t just mean getting perfect grades on math tests; it could mean being a skilled puzzle-solver, having a knack for building, or always being able to make your friends laugh. There are many paths to success and many ways to absorb and act upon new information.

Take the time to uncover your child’s learning style by taking our quiz. This will help you figure out how your child learns most naturally and will allow you to adjust course when needed.

Remind them that everyone is a learner

Along the same lines as multiple learning styles, the idea that everyone is a learner is something to share with your child as well. Children need to see that the adults in their lives make mistakes too, and this helps them understand that everyone is learning.

Model a growth mindset for your child: instead of saying “I’m bad at this,” say, “Wow! This is something I could really use more practice with.” Showing your own vulnerabilities can be difficult, but it helps your children to relate to the idea that everyone struggles with something and everyone can improve.

Many children wonder if they are stupid from time to time, but if your child chooses to ask you this loaded question, remind them of the power of perseverance! Tell them that everyone is a learner and that people are all strong and weak in different ways. These messages along with some strategies for managing frustration will result in meaningful conversations that can change children’s’ mindsets for years to come.

Free Online Video Training

In February 2017, I will be releasing a 3-part video training focusing on how parents can build critical thinking skills in children preschool through second grade.

The training will start with explaining the “what” and “why” of critical thinking including it’s potential for academic motivation in preschoolers, struggling students and gifted learners.

Then we’ll review assumptions that prevent parents from fostering (and children from gaining) “good thinking” experiences, and the impacts of these pitfalls on a child’s ability to build proficient reading skills and math number sense.

The last video will give you some quick & easy tips to implement into your already (time-strapped) busy schedule. If you are interested in this training, just click here to you’ll be signed up to be notified when the videos are ready.

 

Offscreen vs. Onscreen Learning

 

HOW TO BALANCE TECHNOLOGY & PLAY

Create a structure around both off and onscreen learning

The key factor isn’t the means through which your child is learning: it’s the structure around it. For example, giving your child free reign to do whatever he or she pleases on an iPad may be somewhat less effective than scheduling a block of time for them to engage in highly-acclaimed learning apps.

This holds true for offscreen play as well. You don’t need to dictate every activity your child engages in, but it’s good to be cognizant of how they spend the blocks of time where no screen is involved.

Remain a part of the process

Whether you’re helping your child build something from blocks or asking questions about the learning app they’re playing with, your participation matters.

While it can be tempting to let your child “figure it out on their own”, it’s important to remain invested in the process. Ask questions, show your interest, and let your child know that you want to be involved, regardless of what the activity may be. Continue reading “Offscreen vs. Onscreen Learning”

How To Prevent Bullying In The Pre-K Through 3rd Grade Classroom.

Kick Bullying to the Curb

How to prevent bullying in the Pre-K through 3rd Grade Classroom.

When thinking about bullying, I find many parents and teachers immediately gravitate to the image of a middle or high school student showing cruelty to their classmates. In reality, bullying starts much younger than this (as early as Pre-K!). Often, by the time
young children hit their pre-teens their ‘bully’ personalities have already begun to make mischief. This is why it’s so important to teach fairness, sharing, and compassion from an early age.
My experiences with parents and teachers who deal with a bully and bullied children led to the creation of Stanley the Snack Snatcher. This short, compelling story provides teachers and parents with a tool to begin conversations about bullying. In addition, there are a number of strategies teachers can use to prevent bullying in the classroom, including creating a classroom community, involving parents, and keeping an
open dialogue.

Create a Classroom Community.

Bullying often stems from kids who are isolated: isolated from their peers, their families, or their communities. One way to prevent bullying is to make sure every student in your classroom feels like a valued member of the classroom community.
There are many ways to do this, but one that many teachers use is a daily circle time with an activity called “Give, Get, Pass.” Each student gets a turn in the circle, and when it is
their turn, they can choose to give a compliment to the classmate of their choice, get a compliment from a classmate of their choice, or simply pass. At first, this activity is very surface level- “I like your clothes. I like your hair,” but with time, grows much more meaningful and really makes each student feel valued. Another circle time activity is a daily share, where one or two students share anything they want- something they did at home, something they’re excited about, something that happened at lunch. Other students actively listen and ask questions about the sharing
topic.
The activity itself isn’t as important as the intention behind it; encouraging compassion, understanding, and a safe place to share. Outside of circle time, this community can be emphasized by promoting collaboration and discussion. Showing each child that their opinion is valued, not just by the teacher, but also by their peers, is crucial to building empathy.

Involve Parents

 No parent wants to hear that their child is bullying or being bullied, but the sooner parents are involved, the better. Teachers should immediately communicate any concerns about bullying to the parents of the bully and the bullied. This can help in two main ways.
First, parents will be able to speak with their children at home. In some cases, this may be all the redirection they need. In doing this, parents have the opportunity to help their child learn empathy and sharing.
Second, parents can often shed light on why bullying might be happening. Perhaps there are changes at home- a new baby, a new job, a new routine. Even small changes can seem drastic to young children, so making sure that teachers and parents are partners with open communication is key.
Keep an open dialogue about bullying. Each child arrives with different experiences, backgrounds, and ideas about their world.
As you guide them through the school year, it’s important to embrace and value these differences. Even more important is maintaining a dialogue around these difference as well as behavioral red flags. Young children often know right from wrong, but it is a lesson that needs to be reinforced. Talk to your class about bully behavior and why it is wrong. Use a book about bullying, like Stanley the Snack Snatcher, to guide your conversation, allowing children to openly share their experiences.

Bullying stops when we begin to value one another’s differences

At the end of the day, I believe it is vital for young children to learn how to value the differences among their peers, maintain a sense of community, and deal with conflict in an empathetic manner.
We all want what is best for our child, and part of this is providing a safe, healthy learning environment filled with mutual respect and trust. By approaching the issue of bullying from an early age, we can cultivate this environment.

What Does Prep Have To Do With Being Gifted?

What does prep have to do with being gifted?

I spend a lot of time talking about the value of “thinking prep” and how to effectively prepare your children to be thoughtful, curious individuals. The Critical Thinking Child was founded on this idea, and the prep we provide does so much more than prepare your child for a test–it cultivates a lifelong love of learning.

But what does prep have to do with being gifted?

It’s a good question, and one I hear frequently. My answer?

You can’t wish, teach or prep a child to be gifted but you can improve their thinking skills

As parents, we can give the gift of education but you can’t wish, teach, or prep a child to be gifted.

A child’s gifts take on many forms, and even the term “gifted” is often nuanced.  We prefer terms like high-performing, high-achieving or high-potential students.

Does this mean prep is useless? Of course not. Children acquire and build their gifts and talents through exposure to the world around them.  Our program focuses on nurturing these natural gifts within your child. We stimulate and stretch their natural talents and supports their academic struggles. Our prep is an opportunity to teach your child how to think critically, regardless of labels.

Through critical thinking, children have the potential to be our greatest assets

The skills we teach at The Critical Thinking Child support talented children in reaching their full potential. Our students develop higher-level thinking skills and accelerate their academic potential. Under our care, children learn to concentrate, listen, and focus. All of our prep serves this purpose.

In addition, we want to empower you, as a parent, to foster your child’s gifts at home. Highly intelligent, unique children may require more attention, and our tips and strategies will help you promote and nurture them in their daily life. Together, we will be able to help children develop their critical thinking skills and give them a chance to explore their interests and discover their passions.

By doing so, we awaken within our children their potential to be our greatest thinkers, scientists, teachers, artists, and leaders.

Gifting education to your future generation

Something magical happens through our program. As we connect with the child, they begin to explore and ask questions. They hone in on their talents and passions and develop a deeper understanding of their world. Our parents are able to witness and experience the joy of their gift of education.

Let’s be honest, enrolling in our program will not make your child gifted.

What it will accomplish is giving you, as a parent, the chance to give the gift of education.

I stand by our motto—“Gifting Education to Your Future Generation”—and together, we will give your child the chance to reach their academic potential and prep for a lifetime love of learning, inquiry, and exploration.

Smart Homework Tips.

Is your child failing their homework?

Three smart ways to help your child succeed on their homework.

Few students return from school at the end of the day full of excitement and eagerness about their homework. In my experience, even the most gifted students (sometimes especially gifted students) approach their homework assignments with a certain amount of anxiety, irritation, or distaste. After all, they just spent the whole day at school, why should they need to work more?

Motivating and helping your child succeed can be a daunting task, and no small number of fights have begun at the homework table. Rather than preparing for battle, I recommend taking the stress away from homework. As a parent, you fill the role of monitor and motivator. To do this successfully means implementing a few simple practices.

Blur the lines between learning and playing

So often young learners are restricted from “play time” until they successfully complete their homework. Essentially, they are told they are not allowed to have fun until they finish learning. It’s no wonder so many students are resistant!

Instead of holding fun over your child’s head as a motivator, reinforce the idea that learning is fun. Not only that, but it’s a part of everyday experiences. While homework may be a more formal version of learning, each game they play, every curiosity they satisfy, also teaches them.

Remind your child of this by integrating fun, learning activities into their routine and allowing homework to be a part of that.

Ask open-ended questions

It can be tempting to take on your child’s homework as your own burden, but it’s important to resist the urge. Instead of hovering over them, act as a facilitator. If they begin to struggle, ask open-ended questions that prompt them to think for themselves, instead of fishing for answers.

Questions such as, “How can you think about this in a different way?” or “What part of this problem is hard for you?” will teach your child to verbalize their difficulties while also approaching them from new angles. As an added bonus, when you monitor your child in this way you become less of a disciplinarian and more of a motivator. They can look to you for advice, but ultimately they are responsible for their own learning.

Incorporate breaks

Asking your child to do all of their homework at once may be hurting more than helping, especially if they’re bogged down by a huge amount. Instead, block off specific times for completing homework and encourage your child to take breaks frequently. Most young children have short attention spans, and when they become frustrated their ability to problem solve is greatly reduced.

Give your child 15 – 30 minutes to work on their homework in earnest, then break it up with an activity that requires some amount of movement or shift in thinking. Once they’ve had 10 – 20 minutes away from their assignment, encourage them to return to it. This will allow them to approach it with a fresh mind.

As your child gets older they may be able to work uninterrupted for longer periods of time. Be mindful of them as they work, and if they seem to be overly stressed or anxious, remind them to step back.

Are you creating a positive atmosphere around homework?

When you implement these tricks you allow your child to approach their homework with a more positive mindset. It becomes less of a battleground and more of a playground. While your child may never view homework as their favorite activity, they will slowly come to think of it as a part of their day-to-day routine.

When Your Busy Child Won’t Focus

When your busy child won’t focus

How to get–and keep–your child’s attention.

 

When your young child is constantly distracted by, well, everything, it can be hard to make learning stick. Sometimes it can be difficult just to get their attention long enough to check in with them, let alone introduce a new concept.

While it can be frustrating to have a child who seems constantly preoccupied, it is possible to teach them how to become more adept at compartmentalizing and focusing. This revolves around two key skills: listening and attention.

Honing in on listening skills

Listening skills come into play when students have something they need to remember and focus on. For example, activities that require pattern recognition also require a good amount of focus. If students are seeking out a familiar pattern (ABAB, for instance), they will need to trust in their own ability to focus. If they begin to struggle, they will have to seek help and practice listening to the prompts given to them.

Similarly, memory games help students improve their recall and their ability to retell stories. I’m particularly fond of abstract puzzles, which provide a layer of complexity that often requires the use of listening skills. Putting children in pairs can also help develop this skill.

Finally, you can help your young learner develop listening skills by reading to them. By teaching young learners to recognize and focus on the sounds of the English language they will be more tuned to it. This includes the 44 phonic sounds, rhymes, onomatopoeia, and alliteration. Picture books and beginning chapter books are great starting points. For the particularly distracted child, don’t pressure them to finish the book in one sitting. You can always go back to it or re-read it.

Developing longer attention spans

Help your child increase their attention span by providing them with activities that grab their interest and keep it. For example, if their focus seems to wander when reading books, switch up the genre. By deviating beyond fairy tale stories and including a wider variety, you allow students to find their preferences.

In particular, including books with real-world information will give them a new perspective on reading and digesting information. If your child finds a topic they are particularly enthralled by, encourage their interest

Additionally, critical thinking games and puzzles provide ample opportunities for developing attention spans. Forcing your child to think outside of the box through new topics, classifications, and activities will help them understand and interpret their world in new ways. This often results in a spark of curiosity and interest, leading to longer attention spans.

The benefits of abstract puzzles

Abstract puzzles are a great way to help encourage students to be more focused. As you can see from the video below, when abstract puzzles are introduced into a child’s learning environment it requires both listening skills and a long attention span:

 

The Critical Thinking Child Difference

The Critical Thinking Child Difference

How Our Test Prep is Actually “Think” Prep

 

A few years ago a dad came to me seeking test prep services for his four-year-old daughter.  As an educator, this isn’t unusual, but this specific instance was memorable to me for three reasons:

  1. His guilt and regret about neglecting to test his first child (a bright and intellectually curious six-year-old) for the gifted kindergarten program. His son was an early reader and academically ahead of his preschool peers, but they didn’t seek testing.
  2. The sacrifices his family made based on their financial priorities. They focused on three key areas: education, health, and retirement.  This meant he invested big bucks in his children’s education.
  3. His anxiety and stress around figuring out which resources to buy and how to best help his bright, shy 4-year-old daughter so she could excel academically on the day of the gifted test.

 

Like this parent, you invest in education because you expect the best for your child. You want them to learn and grow in the most beneficial way possible. I know, as I experienced the same with my children. I wanted them to see learning as a positive experience, one they looked forward to.

Unfortunately, many academic organizations focus too much time and energy on old-school techniques, like rote memorization, drilling, and lower-level thinking skills.

Test prep is particularly guilty of this.  Young kids learn to cram and memorize skills which are often forgotten and rarely applied after the test.

In a perfect world, you want your child to learn skills that are sustainable. When tested, you want them to feel calm and ready to put their best foot forward, not anxious and overwhelmed. This is why I built The Critical Thinking Boot Camp for Kids: to be fun and engaging and, above all, useful beyond the test.  It’s about think prep rather than test prep.

Here are a few ways in which The Critical Thinking Child Boot Camp for Kids stands apart.

We build confidence

With activities that take into consideration all possible learning styles, our program is geared to your child’s exact needs. This helps to break down barriers and make learning accessible to all of the students. Even better, children are able to practice learning in their dominant and their non-dominant learning styles, which helps to boost their confidence.

We also help to create an atmosphere of healthy competition. Instead of comparing students to one another, we focus on individual progress. We teach our students to identify their own academic strengths and opportunities for improvement. We also teach them to celebrate their mistakes, using positive praise to help them learn and grow. This fosters a growth mindset and helps them understand that learning is a lifelong process and it is okay to make mistakes.

Additionally, we take time to model and demonstrate all of our lessons. These examples, combined with critical thinking questions, help students become familiar with a variety of concepts, even when they are presented in new ways. We start practicing at a young age to help students develop these skills early.

We take learning beyond the classroom

 

When I first created The Critical Thinking Child Boot Camp for Kids I wanted to create an atmosphere where parents and children were companions in learning. We bring parents into the equation, providing the tools and resources necessary to make learning an everyday experience. This includes a Parent Mastermind Group and various online learning opportunities. We show children how to think critically about their world, and we help parents promote this way of thinking at home.

In doing this, we help ensure that young learners continue to practice their critical thinking skills no matter where they are. Easy-to-implement tools make it simple for parents to guide their child. As a result, the young learner is able to create a lifelong habit of approaching their world with curiosity and a joy of learning.

We also help students become comfortable with using technology as a learning tool. Through technology, we enhance the learning experience, rather than interrupting it. This allows students to continue learning even outside of the classroom. All of our learning tools are designed and developed by award-winning educators and local teaching artists, so you know your child is getting a great experience.

We are founded on fun

Because true critical thinking is rooted in inquiry and discovery, I aim to help young learners understand their world through play. The activities presented during test prep help students think about their world in a way that makes sense to them. We encourage children to have fun and to ask questions, stretching their creative muscles in the process.

This means incorporating a wide range of activities throughout sessions, including visual art, science, music, arithmetic, and even origami. Each of these activities is designed to help students understand abstract topics in a fun, accessible way.

We don’t teach to the test, we teach to the student

Many test prep organizations simply drill students on possible test topics. Not only is this approach ineffective and boring, it limits learning.

Instead of focusing mainly on memorization and worksheets, we focus on the thinking process itself. Our goal is to help nurture children’s natural curiosity, rather than frustrating them. With this in mind, we focus on activities that advance a child’s true and natural abilities.

As a result, students gain confidence in verbal reasoning, non-verbal reasoning, reading, math reasoning, listening skills, and memory. They also learn which test prep strategies work best for them.

At The Critical Thinking Child, we instill a lifelong passion for learning

The Critical Thinking Child LLC has helped countless students successfully prepare for classical and gifted admissions tests. More importantly, we have shown students that learning is a process of discovery. We bring the joy back to learning and promote a lifelong love of curiosity.

We believe that by helping children think critically about the world, we are helping create adults who will be able to change it for the better. As a result, our students have greater problem-solving skills, verbal and non-verbal skills, and transferable skills across multiple subjects. Our parents feel confident in their child’s academic path, and our students are excited to participate in a fun learning environment.